Avnet, Inc.
AVNET INC (Form: 10-K, Received: 08/12/2016 16:39:23)

Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 


 

Form 10-K

 

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended July 2, 2016

or

 

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from                      to                     

Commission file number 1-4224

Avnet, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

New York

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

    

11-1890605

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)  

 

 

 

2211 South 47th Street,

Phoenix, Arizona

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

85034

(Zip Code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (480) 643-2000

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

 

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Common Stock

 

New York Stock Exchange

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes No

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

    

Accelerated filer

    

Non-accelerated filer

(Do not check

if a smaller reporting company)

    

Smaller reporting company  

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes No

The aggregate market value (approximate) of the registrant’s common equity held by non-affiliates based on the closing price of a share of the registrant’s common stock for New York Stock Exchange composite transactions on December 31, 2015 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter) was $5,598,302,926.

As of July 29, 2016, the total number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s Common Stock was 127,365,721 shares, net of treasury shares.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement (to be filed pursuant to Reg. 14A) relating to the Annual Meeting of Shareholders anticipated to be held on November 10, 2016,  are incorporated herein by reference in Part III of this Report.

 

 

 

 


 

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

    

Page

PART I  

 

 

 

Item 1. Business  

 

3

 

 

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors  

 

8

 

 

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments  

 

15

 

 

 

Item 2. Properties  

 

16

 

 

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings  

 

16

 

 

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures  

 

16

 

 

 

PART II  

 

 

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities  

 

17

 

 

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data  

 

20

 

 

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations  

 

22

 

 

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk  

 

37

 

 

 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data  

 

38

 

 

 

Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure  

 

38

 

 

 

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures  

 

38

 

 

 

Item 9B. Other Information  

 

39

 

 

 

PART III  

 

 

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance  

 

40

 

 

 

Item 11. Executive Compensation  

 

40

 

 

 

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters  

 

40

 

 

 

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence  

 

40

 

 

 

Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services  

 

40

 

 

 

PART IV  

 

 

 

Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules  

 

41

 

 

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PART I

Item 1. Business

Avnet, Inc., incorporated in New York in 1955, together with its consolidated subsidiaries (the “Company” or “Avnet”), is a global value-added distributor of electronic components, enterprise computer, networking and storage products and software, IT solutions and services and embedded subsystems. Avnet creates a vital link in the technology supply chain that connects the world’s leading electronic component and computer product manufacturers and software developers with a global customer base of original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”), electronic manufacturing services (“EMS”) providers, original design manufacturers (“ODMs”), systems integrators (“SIs”), independent software vendors (“ISVs”) and value-added resellers (“VARs”). Avnet distributes electronic components, computer products and software, as received from its suppliers or through a customized solution, and offers assembly and other value-added services.

Organizational Structure

Avnet has two primary operating groups — Electronics Marketing (“EM”) and Technology Solutions (“TS”). Both operating groups have operations in each of the three major economic regions of the world: the Americas; Europe, the Middle East and Africa (“EMEA”); and Asia/Pacific, consisting of Asia, Australia and New Zealand (“Asia”). Each operating group has its own management team led by a group president and includes regional leaders and senior executives within the operating group who manage various functions within such businesses. Each operating group also has distinct financial reporting that is evaluated at the executive level on which operating decisions and strategic planning for the Company as a whole are made. Divisions (“business units”) exist within each operating group that serve primarily as sales and marketing units to further streamline the sales and marketing efforts within each operating group and enhance each operating group’s ability to work with its customers and suppliers, generally along more specific product lines or geographies. However, each business unit relies heavily on the support services provided by the operating groups as well as centralized support at the Corporate level.

A description of each operating group is presented below. Further financial information by operating group and region i s provided in Note 16 “Segment i nformation” to the consolidated financial statements appearing in Item 15 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Avnet’s foreign operations are subject to a variety of risks. These risks are discussed further under Risk Factors in Item 1A and under Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk in Item 7A of this Report. Additionally, the specific translation impacts of foreign currency fluctuations, most notably the Euro, on the Company’s consolidated financial statements are further discussed in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in Item 7 of this Report.

Electronics Marketing

EM markets and sells semiconductors, interconnect, passive and electromechanical devices (“IP&E”) and embedded products for the world’s leading electronic component manufacturers. With a global reach that extends to more than 70 countries, EM’s products and services cater to a diverse customer base serving many end-markets including automotive, communications, computer hardware and peripherals, industrial and manufacturing, medical equipment, and defense and aerospace. EM also offers an array of customer support that help customers evaluate, design-in and procure electronic components throughout the lifecycle of their technology products and systems. By working with EM, customers and suppliers can accelerate their time to market and realize cost efficiencies in both the design and manufacturing process.

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EM Design Chain Solutions

EM offers design chain support for suppliers that provides customer engineers with a host of technical design solutions, which help make it economically viable to reach a customer segment that seeks complex products and technologies. With access to a suite of design tools and engineering support from any point in the design cycle, customers can get product specifications along with evaluation kits and reference designs that enable a broad range of applications from concept through detailed design including new product introduction. EM also offers engineering and technical resources deployed globally to support product design, bill of materials development and technical education and training. By utilizing EM’s design chain support, customers can optimize their component selection and accelerate their time to market. The extensive product line card EM offers provides customers access to a diverse range of products from a complete spectrum of electronic component manufacturers.

EM Supply Chain Solutions

EM supply chain support and logistical services provide end-to-end solutions focused on OEMs, EMS providers and electronic component manufacturers, enabling them to optimize supply chains on a local, regional or global basis. By combining internal competencies in global warehousing and logistics, finance, information technology and asset management with its global footprint and extensive partner relationships, EM’s supply chain support and services develop a deeper level of engagement with its customers. These customers can continuously manage their supply chains to meet the demands of a competitive environment globally without a commensurate investment in physical assets, systems and personnel. With supply chain planning tools and a variety of inventory management solutions, EM can provide unique solutions that meet a customer’s just-in-time requirements and minimize risk in a variety of scenarios including lean manufacturing, demand flow and outsourcing.

Embedded Solutions

EM Embedded provides embedded computing solutions including technical design, integration and assembly to developers of application-specific computing solutions in the non-PC market. EM Embedded also provides solutions for intelligent embedded and innovative display solutions primarily targeting industrial applications, including touch and passive displays. In addition, EM Embedded develops and manufactures standard board and industrial subsystems and application-specific devices that enable it to produce specialized systems tailored to specific customer requirements. EM Embedded serves OEMs that require embedded systems and solutions, including engineering, product prototyping, integration and other value-added services in the medical, telecommunications, industrial and digital editing markets.

EM Sales and Marketing Divisions

Each of EM’s regions has sales and marketing business units that generally focus on a specific geography, customer segment, or particular product lines. The business units offer access to one of the industry’s broadest product line cards and convenient one-stop shopping with an emphasis on responsiveness, engineering support, on-time delivery and quality. Certain support services are made available to the individual business units through shared support service units. Customers are further supported by a sophisticated e-Commerce platform, which includes a host of powerful functions such as parametric search capabilities for component part selection, bill of material optimization and component cross-referencing. The platform enables end-to-end online service from part and available inventory searches, price checking and ordering to online payment.

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Technology Solutions

As a leading global IT solutions distributor, TS works with its business partners in the supply chain to create and deliver effective datacenter and IT lifecycle solutions that solve the business challenges of end-users around the world. These IT solutions span the entire IT lifecycle and are sold and delivered to a variety of TS’ customer partners, including VARs, ISVs, SIs and OEMs. These solutions can include any combination of hardware, software and supplies, and TS provided services that address among other items, infrastructure and application management, cloud computing, automation, orchestration, datacenter transformation, security, big data, aftermarket and IT lifecycle services, and multilingual vendor accredited training. In addition, TS provides the latest hard disk drives and microprocessor, motherboard and DRAM module technologies to personal computing integrators and VARs.

Customer partners rely on TS’ supplier relationships and experienced logistics, sales, marketing, financial, technical and IT experts to help them identify and capitalize on business opportunities in high-growth technologies, vertical markets and geographies. Suppliers rely on TS’ technology expertise and global scale and scope to broaden their customer base and grow sales in markets around the world. TS and its ecosystem of highly trained and knowledgeable channel partners serve as an extension of suppliers' salesforces to sell and deliver end-to-end IT solutions to end users. Through dedicated practices and partnerships, TS and its channel partners provide the education, tools, resources, skills and support needed around technologies like storage, networking and security, along with industry-leading solutions and services incorporating next-generation technologies like big data and analytics, cloud computing and converged infrastructure. They also provide the specialization required to successfully implement and maintain these solutions in vertical markets, including energy, finance, government, healthcare and retail.

To continue to meet customer expectations in an evolving IT ecosystem, TS and its channel partners are focused on delivering solutions that expand end users' product delivery capabilities, extend their reach and resources, and enhance project success and return on investment for deployments that span the entire IT lifecycle.

Acquisitions

Avnet has historically pursued business acquisitions to further its strategic objectives and support key business initiatives. This acquisition program was a significant factor in Avnet becoming one of the largest value-added distributors of electronic components, enterprise computer, networking and storage products and software, IT solutions and services and embedded subsystems. Avnet expects to continue to pursue strategic acquisitions to expand its market presence, increase its scale and scope, and increase its product and service offerings.

During fiscal 2016, the Company completed two acquisitions with aggregate annualized sales of approximately $120.0 million. See Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in Part II of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information on acquisitions completed during fiscal 2016.

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Major Products

One of Avnet’s competitive strengths is the breadth and quality of the suppliers whose products it distributes. IBM products accounted for approximately 11%, 11% and 13% of the Company’s consolidated billings during fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively, and was the only supplier from which billings of its products, software and services exceeded 10% of consolidated billings. Listed in the table below are the major product categories and the Company’s approximate sales of each during the past three fiscal years. Fiscal 2016 contained 53 weeks compared to 52 weeks in the other fiscal years presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended

 

 

    

July 2,

    

June 27,

    

June 28,

 

 

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

 

 

 

(Millions)

 

Semiconductors

 

$

14,654.0

 

$

15,715.8

 

$

14,558.4

 

Computer products, software and services

 

 

9,025.6

 

 

9,614.2

 

 

10,571.6

 

Connectors, passives, electromechanical and other

 

 

2,539.7

 

 

2,594.7

 

 

2,369.7

 

Sales

 

$

26,219.3

 

$

27,924.7

 

$

27,499.7

 

Competition & Markets

The electronic components and IT solutions industries continue to be extremely competitive and are subject to rapid technological advances. The Company’s major competitors include Arrow Electronics, Inc., Future Electronics and World Peace Group, and, to a lesser extent, Ingram Micro, Inc. and Tech Data Corp. There are also certain smaller, specialized competitors who generally focus on narrower regions, markets, products or particular sectors. In addition, the Company may compete with its own suppliers that maintain a direct salesforce. As a result of these factors, Avnet must remain competitive in its pricing of products and services.

A key competitive factor in the electronic component and IT solutions distribution industry is the need to carry a sufficient amount of inventory to meet customers’ rapid delivery requirements. To minimize its exposure related to inventory on hand, the majority of the Company’s products are purchased pursuant to non-exclusive distributor agreements, which typically provide certain protections for product obsolescence and price erosion. These agreements are generally cancelable upon 30 to 180 days’ notice and, in most cases, provide for or require inventory return privileges upon cancellation. In addition, the Company enhances its competitive position by offering a variety of value-added services, which entail the performance of services and/or customer support tailored to individual customer specifications and business needs such as point of use replenishment, testing, assembly, supply chain management and materials management. For the last three fiscal years ended July 2, 2016, sales of services constituted less than 10% of the Company’s total sales.

A competitive advantage is the breadth of the Company’s supplier product line card. Because of the number of Avnet’s suppliers, many customers can simplify their procurement process and make all of their required purchases from Avnet, rather than purchasing from several different vendors.

Seasonality

Historically, Avnet’s business has not been materially impacted by seasonality, with the exception of a relatively minor impact on consolidated results from the growth in sales at the TS business during the December quarter primarily driven by the calendar year end selling and buying patterns of key suppliers and customers, respectively.

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Number of Employees

At July 2, 2016, Avnet had approximately 17,700 employees compared to 18,800 employees at June 27, 2015, and 19,000 at June 28, 2014.

Available Information

The Company files its annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, proxy statements and other documents with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. A copy of any document the Company files with the SEC is available for review at the SEC’s public reference room, 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. The public may obtain information on the public reference room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The Company’s SEC filings are also available to the public on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov and through the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”), 20 Broad Street, New York, New York 10005, on which the Company’s common stock is listed.

A copy of any of the Company’s filings with the SEC, or any of the agreements or other documents that constitute exhibits to those filings, can be obtained by request directed to the Company at the following address and telephone number:

Avnet, Inc.

2211 South 47 th Street

Phoenix, Arizona 85034

(480) 643-2000

Attention: Corporate Secretary

The Company also makes these filings available, free of charge, through its website (see “Avnet Website” below).

Avnet Website

In addition to the information about Avnet contained in this Report, extensive information about the Company can be found at www.avnet.com , including information about its management team, products and services and corporate governance practices.

The corporate governance information on the website includes the Company’s Corporate Governance Guidelines, the Code of Conduct and the charters for each of the committees of Avnet’s Board of Directors. In addition, amendments to the Code of Conduct, committee charters and waivers granted to directors and executive officers under the Code of Conduct, if any, will be posted in this area of the website. These documents can be accessed at www.avnet.com under the “Investors — Corporate governance” caption. Printed versions of the Corporate Governance Guidelines, Code of Conduct and charters of the Board committees can be obtained, free of charge, by writing to the Company at the address listed above in “Available Information.”

In addition, the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports, if any, filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as well as Section 16 filings made by any of the Company’s executive officers or directors with respect to Avnet common stock, are available on the Company’s website ( www.avnet.com under the “Investors — SEC filings” caption) as soon as reasonably practicable after the report is electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission.

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These details about Avnet’s website and its content are only for information. The contents of the Company’s website are not, nor shall they be deemed to be, incorporated by reference in this Report.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors

Forward-Looking Statements and Risk Factors

This Report contains forward-looking statements with respect to the financial condition, results of operations and business of Avnet. These statements are generally identified by words like “believes,” “plans,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “should,” “will,” “may,” “estimates” or similar expressions. Forward-looking statements are subject to numerous assumptions, risks and uncertainties. Except as required by law, Avnet does not undertake any obligation to update any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. Factors that may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in the forward-looking statements include those discussed below.

The factors discussed below make the Company’s operating results for future periods difficult to predict and, therefore, prior results are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected in future periods. Any of the below factors, or any other factors discussed elsewhere in this Report, may have an adverse effect on the Company’s financial results, operations, prospects and liquidity. The Company’s operating results have fluctuated in the past and likely will continue to do so. If the Company’s operating results fall below its forecasts and the expectations of public market analysts and investors, the trading price of the Company’s common stock will likely decrease.

Economic weakness and geopolitical uncertainty could adversely affect the Company’s results and prospects.

The Company’s financial results, operations and prospects depend significantly on worldwide economic and geopolitical conditions, the demand for its products and services, and the financial condition of its customers and suppliers. Economic weakness and geopolitical uncertainty have in the past resulted, and may result in the future, in decreased sales, margins and earnings. Economic weakness and geopolitical uncertainty may also lead the Company to impair assets, including goodwill, intangible assets and other long-lived assets, take restructuring actions and reduce expenses in response to decreased sales or margins. The Company may not be able to adequately adjust its cost structure in a timely fashion, which may adversely impact its profitability. Uncertainty about economic conditions may increase foreign currency volatility in markets in which the Company transacts business, which may negatively impact the Company’s results. Economic weakness and geopolitical uncertainty also make it more difficult for the Company to manage inventory levels and/or collect customer receivables, which may result in provisions to create reserves, write-offs, reduced access to liquidity and higher financing costs.

The Company experiences significant competitive pressure, which may negatively impact its results.

The market for the Company’s products and services is very competitive and subject to rapid technological advances, new market entrants, non-traditional competitors, changes in industry standards and changes in customer needs and consumption models. Not only does the Company compete with other global distributors, it also competes for customers with regional distributors and some of the Company’s own suppliers that maintain direct sales efforts. In addition, as the Company expands its offerings and geographies, the Company may encounter increased competition from current or new competitors. The Company’s failure to maintain and enhance its competitive position could adversely affect its business and prospects. Furthermore, the Company’s efforts to compete in the marketplace could cause deterioration of gross profit margins and, thus, overall profitability.

The size of the Company’s competitors vary across market sectors, as do the resources the Company has allocated to the sectors and geographic areas in which it does business. Therefore, some competitors may have greater resources or a more extensive customer or supplier base than the Company has in one or more of its market sectors and geographic  

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areas,   which   may   result   in   the   Company   not   being   able   to   effectively   compete   in   certain   markets   which   could   impact   the   Company’s   profitability   and   prospects.

Changes in customer needs and consumption models could significantly affect the Company’s operating results.

Changes in customer needs and consumption models may cause a decline in the Company’s billings, which would have a negative impact on the Company’s financial results. As end users migrate to cloud-based IT infrastructure and software-as-a-service, the Company’s sales of hardware products may be reduced, thereby negatively impacting the Company’s results. Further, economic weakness may cause a decline in spending on information technology, hardware or software products, which could have a negative impact on TS. While the Company attempts to identify changes in market conditions as soon as possible, the dynamics of these industries make prediction of and timely reaction to such changes difficult. Future downturns in the semiconductor and technology industries could adversely affect the Company’s operating results and negatively impact the Company’s ability to maintain its current profitability levels. In addition, the semiconductor and IT industries have historically experienced periodic fluctuations in product supply and demand, often associated with changes in economic conditions, technology and manufacturing capacity. During each of the last three fiscal years, sales of semiconductors represented approximately 50% of the Company’s consolidated sales, and the Company’s sales, particularly those of EM, closely follow the strength or weakness of the semiconductor industry.

Failure to maintain or add relationships with key suppliers could adversely affect the Company’s sales.

One of the Company’s competitive strengths is the breadth and quality of the suppliers whose products the Company distributes. However, billings of products and services from one of the Company’s suppliers, IBM, accounted for approximately 11% of the Company’s consolidated billings in fiscal 2016. Management expects IBM products and services to continue to account for roughly a similar percentage of the Company’s consolidated billings in fiscal 2017. The Company’s contracts with its suppliers, including those with IBM, vary in duration and are generally terminable by either party at will upon notice. To the extent IBM or other primary suppliers significantly reduce their volume of business with the Company in the future, because of a product shortage, an unwillingness to do business with Avnet, changes in strategy or otherwise, the Company’s business and relationships with its customers could be negatively affected because its customers depend on the Company’s distribution of technology hardware and software from the industry’s leading suppliers. In addition, suppliers’ strategy shifts or performance issues may negatively affect the Company’s financial results. The competitive landscape has also experienced a consolidation among suppliers, which could negatively impact the Company’s profitability and customer base. Further, to the extent that any of the Company’s key suppliers modify the terms of their contracts including, without limitation, the terms regarding price protection, rights of return, rebates or other terms that protect or enhance the Company’s gross margins, it could negatively affect the Company’s results of operations, financial condition or liquidity.

The technology industry is characterized by rapid innovation and the frequent introduction of new and enhanced hardware, software and services offerings. The Company’s success is dependent, in part, on its ability to distribute cutting-edge emerging technology. To the extent that the Company is not able to distribute a product that is highly in demand in one or more geographic areas, or the Company is unable to develop relationships with new technology suppliers that it has not historically represented, the Company’s business and results of operations could be adversely impacted.

The Company’s non-U.S. locations represent a significant portion of its sales and, consequently, the Company is exposed to risks associated with operating internationally.

During fiscal 2016, 2015 and 2014 approximately 64%, 64% and 65%, respectively, of the Company’s sales came from its operations outside the United States. As a result of the Company’s international operations, in particular those in

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emerging and developing economies, the Company’s operations are subject to a variety of risks that are specific to international operations, including, but not limited to, the following:

·

potential restrictions on the Company’s ability to repatriate funds from its foreign subsidiaries;

·

foreign currency and interest rate fluctuations and the impact on the Company’s results of operations;

·

import and export duties and value-added taxes;

·

compliance with foreign and domestic import and export regulations, data privacy regulations, business licensing requirements, environmental regulations and anti-corruption laws, the failure of which could result in severe penalties including monetary fines, criminal proceedings and suspension of import or export privileges;

·

complex and changing tax laws and regulations;

·

regulatory requirements and prohibitions that differ between jurisdictions;

·

economic and political instability, terrorism and potential military conflicts or civilian unrest;

·

fluctuations in freight costs, limitations on shipping and receiving capacity, and other disruptions in the transportation and shipping infrastructure;

·

natural disasters and health concerns;

·

differing environmental regulations and employment practices and labor issues; and

·

the risk of non-compliance with local laws.

In addition to the cost of compliance, the potential criminal penalties for violations of import or export regulations and anti-corruption laws by the Company or its third-party agents create heightened risks for the Company’s international operations. In the event that a governing regulatory body determined that the Company had violated applicable import or export regulations or anti-corruption laws, the Company could be fined significant sums, incur sizable legal defense costs and/or its import or export capabilities could be restricted, which could have a material and adverse effect on the Company’s business. Additionally, allegations that the Company has violated a governmental regulation may negatively impact the Company’s reputation, which may result in customers or suppliers being unwilling to do business with the Company. While the Company has adopted measures and controls designed to ensure compliance with these laws, the Company cannot be assured that such measures will be adequate or that its business will not be materially and adversely impacted in the event of an alleged violation.

The Company transacts sales, pays expenses, owns assets and incurs liabilities in countries using currencies other than the U.S. Dollar. Because the Company’s consolidated financial statements are presented in U.S. Dollars, the Company must translate sales, income and expenses, as well as assets and liabilities, into U.S. Dollars at exchange rates in effect during each reporting period. Therefore, increases or decreases in the exchanges rates between the U.S. Dollar and other currencies the Company transacts in affect the Company’s reported amounts of sales, operating income, assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies. In addition, unexpected and dramatic changes in foreign currency exchange rates may negatively affect the Company’s earnings from those markets. While the Company may use derivative financial instruments to further reduce its net exposure to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, there can be no assurance that fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates will not materially affect the Company’s financial results. Further, foreign currency instability and disruptions in the credit and capital markets may increase credit risks for some of the Company’s customers and may impair its customers’ ability to repay existing obligations.

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If the Company’s internal information systems fail to function properly, or if the Company is unsuccessful in the implementation, integration or upgrade of information systems, its business operations could suffer.

The Company is dependent on its information systems to facilitate the day-to-day operations of the business and to produce timely, accurate and reliable information on financial and operational results. Currently, the Company’s global operations are tracked with multiple information systems, some of which are subject to ongoing IT projects designed to streamline or optimize the Company’s global information systems. These IT projects are extremely complex, in part, because of a wide range of processes, the multiple legacy systems used and the Company’s business operations. There is no guarantee that the Company will be successful at all times in these efforts or that there will not be implementation or integration difficulties that will adversely affect the Company’s ability to complete business transactions and ensure accurate recording and reporting of financial data. In addition, the Company may be unable to achieve the expected efficiencies and cost savings as a result of the IT projects, thus negatively impacting the Company’s financial results. A failure of any of these information systems in a way described above or material difficulties in upgrading these information systems could have an adverse effect on the Company’s business, internal controls and reporting obligations under federal securities laws.

The Company’s acquisition strategy may not produce the expected benefits, which may adversely affect the Company’s results of operations.

Avnet has made, and expects to continue to make, strategic acquisitions or investments in companies around the world to further its strategic objectives and support key business initiatives. Acquisitions and investments involve risks and uncertainties, some of which may differ from those associated with Avnet’s historical operations. The risks relating to such acquisitions and investments include, but are not limited to, risks relating to expanding into emerging markets and business areas, adding additional product lines and services, impacting existing customer and supplier relationships, incurring costs or liabilities associated with the companies acquired and diverting management’s attention from existing business operations. As a result, the Company’s profitability may be negatively impacted. In addition, the Company may not be successful in integrating the acquired businesses or the integration may be more difficult, costly or time-consuming than anticipated. Further, any litigation relating to a potential acquisition will result in an increase in the expenses associated with the acquisition or cause a delay in completing the acquisition, thereby impacting the Company’s profitability. The Company may experience disruptions that could, depending on the size of the acquisition, have an adverse effect on its business, especially where an acquisition target may have pre-existing compliance issues or pre-existing deficiencies or material weaknesses in internal controls over financial reporting. Furthermore, the Company may not realize all of the anticipated benefits from its acquisitions, which could adversely affect the Company’s financial performance.

Major disruptions to the Company’s logistics capability could have an adverse impact on the Company’s operations.

The Company’s global logistics services are operated through specialized, centralized or outsourced distribution centers around the globe. The Company also depends almost entirely on third-party transportation service providers for the delivery of products to its customers. A major interruption or disruption in service at one or more of its distribution centers for any reason (such as information technology issues, natural disasters, pandemics, or significant disruptions of services from the Company’s third-party transportation providers) could cause cancellations or delays in a significant number of shipments to customers and, as a result, could have an adverse impact on the Company’s business partners, and on the Company’s business, operations and financial performance.

If the Company sustains cyber attacks or other privacy or data security incidents that result in security breaches, it could suffer a loss of sales and increased costs, exposure to significant liability, reputational harm and other negative consequences.

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The Company’s information technology may be subject to cyber attacks, security breaches or computer hacking. Experienced computer programmers and hackers may be able to penetrate the Company’s security controls and misappropriate or compromise sensitive personal, proprietary or confidential information, create system disruptions or cause shutdowns. They also may be able to develop and deploy malicious software programs that attack the Company’s systems or otherwise exploit any security vulnerabilities. The Company’s systems and the data stored on those systems may also be vulnerable to security incidents or security attacks, acts of vandalism or theft, coordinated attacks by activist entities, misplaced or lost data, human errors, or other similar events that could negatively affect the Company’s systems and its data, as well as the data of the Company’s business partners. Further, third parties, such as hosted solution providers, that provide services to the Company, could also be a source of security risk in the event of a failure of their own security systems and infrastructure.

The costs to eliminate or address the foregoing security threats and vulnerabilities before or after a cyber incident could be significant. The Company’s remediation efforts may not be successful and could result in interruptions, delays or cessation of service, and loss of existing or potential suppliers or customers. In addition, breaches of the Company’s security measures and the unauthorized dissemination of sensitive personal, proprietary or confidential information about the Company, its business partners or other third parties could expose the Company to significant potential liability and reputational harm. A s threats related to cyber attacks develop and grow, the Company may also find it necessary to make further investments to protect its data and infrastructure, which may impact the Company’s profitability. Although the Company has insurance coverage for protecting against cyber attacks, it may not be sufficient to cover all possible claims, and the Company may suffer losses that could have a material adverse effect on its business.  As a global enterprise, the Company could also be negatively impacted by existing and proposed laws and regulations, as well as government policies and practices related to cybersecurity, data privacy, data localization and data protection.

Declines in the value of the Company’s inventory or unexpected order cancellations by the Company’s customers could adversely affect its business, results of operations, financial condition and liquidity.

The electronic components and computer products industries are subject to rapid technological change, new and enhanced products, changes in customer needs and changes in industry standards and regulatory requirements, which can contribute to a decline in value or obsolescence of inventory. Regardless of the general economic environment, it is possible that prices will decline due to a decrease in demand or an oversupply of products and, as a result of the price declines, there may be greater risk of declines in inventory value. Although it is the policy of many of the Company’s suppliers to offer certain protections from the loss in value of inventory (such as price protection and limited rights of return), the Company cannot be assured that such policies will fully compensate for the loss in value, or that the suppliers will choose to, or be able to, honor such agreements, some of which are not documented and, therefore, subject to the discretion of the supplier. In addition, the majority of the Company’s sales are made pursuant to individual purchase orders, rather than through long-term sales contracts. Where there is a contract, such contract is generally terminable at will upon notice. The Company cannot be assured that unforeseen new product developments, declines in the value of the Company’s inventory or unforeseen order cancellations by its customers will not adversely affect the Company’s business, results of operations, financial condition or liquidity.

Substantial defaults by the Company’s customers or suppliers on its accounts receivable or the loss of significant customers could have a significant negative impact on the Company’s business, results of operations, financial condition or liquidity.

A significant portion of the Company’s working capital consists of accounts receivable.  If entities responsible for a significant amount of accounts receivable were to cease doing business, direct their business elsewhere, become insolvent or unable to pay the amount they owe the Company, or were to become unwilling or unable to make such payments in a timely manner, the Company’s business, results of operations, financial condition or liquidity could be

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adversely affected. An economic or industry downturn could adversely affect the collectability of these accounts receivable, which could result in longer payment cycles, increased collection costs and defaults in excess of management’s expectations. A significant deterioration in the Company’s ability to collect on accounts receivable in the United States could also impact the cost or availability of financing under its accounts receivable securitization program.

The Company may not have adequate or cost-effective liquidity or capital resources.

The Company’s ability to satisfy its cash needs and implement its capital allocation strategy depends on its ability to generate cash from operations and to access the financial markets, both of which are subject to general economic, financial, competitive, legislative, regulatory and other factors that are beyond the Company’s control.

The Company may need to satisfy its cash needs through external financing. However, external financing may not be available on acceptable terms or at all. As of July 2, 2016, Avnet had total debt outstanding of approximately $2.49 billion under various notes, secured borrowings and committed and uncommitted lines of credit with financial institutions. The Company needs cash to make interest payments on, and to repay, this indebtedness and for general corporate purposes, such as funding its ongoing working capital and capital expenditure needs. Under the terms of any external financing, the Company may incur higher than expected financing expenses and become subject to additional restrictions and covenants. Any material increase in the Company’s financing costs could have an adverse effect on its profitability.

Under certain of its credit facilities, the Company is required to maintain certain specified financial ratios and meet certain tests. If the Company fails to meet these financial ratios and/or tests, it may be unable to continue to utilize these facilities. If the Company is unable to utilize these facilities, it may not have sufficient cash available to make interest payments, to repay indebtedness or for general corporate needs. General economic or business conditions, domestic and foreign, may be less favorable than management expects and could adversely impact the Company’s sales or its ability to collect receivables from its customers, which may impact access to the Company’s accounts receivable securitization program.

In order to be successful, the Company must attract, retain, train, motivate and develop key employees, and failure to do so could adversely impact the Company’s results and strategic initiatives.

In order to be successful, the Company must attract, retain, train, motivate and develop qualified executives and other key employees. Identifying, developing internally or hiring externally, training and retaining qualified employees are critical to the Company’s future, and competition for experienced employees in the Company’s industry can be intense. Changing demographics and labor work force trends may result in a loss of knowledge and skills as experienced workers leave the Company. In addition, as global opportunities and industry demand shifts, and as the Company expands its offerings, realignment, training and hiring of skilled resources may not be sufficiently rapid. From time to time the Company has effected restructurings, which eliminate a number of positions. Even if such personnel are not directly affected by the restructuring effort, such terminations can have a negative impact on morale and the Company’s ability to attract and hire new qualified personnel in the future. If the Company loses existing qualified personnel or is unable to hire new qualified personnel, as needed, the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations could be seriously harmed.

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The agreements governing some of the Company’s financings contain various covenants   and restrictions that limit the discretion of management in operating its business   and could prevent engaging in some activities that may be beneficial to the   Company’s business.

The agreements governing the Company’s financing, including its credit facility, accounts receivable securitization program and the indentures governing the Company’s outstanding notes, contain various covenants and restrictions that, in certain circumstances, limit the Company’s ability, and the ability of certain subsidiaries, to:

·

grant liens on assets;

·

make restricted payments (including, under certain circumstances, paying dividends on common stock or redeeming or repurchasing common stock);

·

make certain investments;

·

merge, consolidate or transfer all or substantially all of the Company’s assets;

·

incur additional debt; or

·

engage in certain transactions with affiliates.

As a result of these covenants and restrictions, the Company may be limited in the future in how it conducts its business and may be unable to raise additional debt, repurchase common stock, pay a dividend, compete effectively or make further investments.

The Company may become involved in intellectual property disputes that could cause it to incur substantial costs, divert the efforts of management or require it to pay substantial damages or licensing fees.

From time to time, the Company receives notifications alleging infringements of intellectual property rights allegedly held by others relating to the Company’s business or the products or services it sells. Litigation with respect to patents or other intellectual property matters could result in substantial costs and diversion of management and other resources and could have an adverse effect on the Company’s operations. Further, the Company may be obligated to indemnify and defend its customers if the products or services the Company sells are alleged to infringe any third party’s intellectual property rights. While the Company may be able to seek indemnification from its suppliers for itself and its customers against such claims, there is no assurance that it will be successful in realizing such indemnification or that the Company will be fully protected against such claims. In addition, the Company is exposed to potential liability for technology that it develops for which it has no indemnification protections. If an infringement claim against the Company is successful, the Company may be required to pay damages or seek royalty or license arrangements, which may not be available on commercially reasonable terms. The Company may have to stop selling certain products or services, which could affect its ability to compete effectively.

Failure to comply with the requirements of environmental regulations could adversely affect the Company’s business.

The Company is subject to various federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations addressing environmental and other impacts from product disposal, use of hazardous materials in products, recycling of products at the end of their useful life and other related matters. While the Company strives to ensure it is in full compliance with all applicable regulations, certain of these regulations impose liability without fault. Additionally, the Company may be held responsible for the prior activities of an entity it acquired. Failure to comply with these regulations could result in substantial costs, fines and civil or criminal sanctions, as well as third-party claims for property damage or personal injury. Further, environmental laws may become more stringent over time, imposing greater compliance costs and increasing risks and penalties associated with violations.

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Changes in tax rules and regulations, changes in interpretation of tax rules and regulations, changes in business performance or unfavorable assessments from tax audits could affect the Company’s effective tax rates, deferred taxes, financial condition and results of operations.

As a multinational corporation, the Company is subject to the tax laws and regulations of the United States and many foreign jurisdictions. From time to time, regulations may be enacted that could adversely affect the Company’s tax positions. There can be no assurance that the Company’s cash flow, and in some cases the effective tax rate, will not be adversely affected by these potential changes in regulations or by changes in the interpretation of existing tax law and regulations. The tax laws and regulations of the various countries where the Company has operations are extremely complex and subject to varying interpretations. Although the Company believes that its historical tax positions are sound and consistent with applicable laws, regulations and existing precedent, there can be no assurance that these tax positions will not be challenged by relevant tax authorities or that the Company would be successful in defending against any such challenge.

The Company’s future income tax expense could also be adversely affected by changes in the mix of earnings in countries with differing statutory tax rates, changes in the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities and changes to its operating structure.

If the Company fails to maintain effective internal controls, it may not be able to report its financial results accurately or timely, or prevent or detect fraud, which could have an adverse effect on the Company’s business or the market price of the Company’s securities.

Effective internal controls over financial reporting are necessary for the Company to provide reasonable assurance with respect to its financial reports and to effectively prevent or detect fraud. If the Company cannot provide reasonable assurance with respect to its financial reports and effectively prevent or detect fraud, its brand and operating results could be harmed. Internal controls over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements because of its inherent limitations, including the possibility of human error, the circumvention or overriding of controls, or fraud. Therefore, even effective internal controls cannot provide absolute assurance with respect to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements. In addition, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting to future periods are subject to the risk that the internal controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate. If the Company fails to maintain the adequacy of its internal controls, including any failure to implement required new or improved internal controls, or if the Company experiences difficulties in their implementation, the Company’s business and operating results could be harmed, the Company may be subject to sanctions or investigations by regulatory authorities, and the Company could fail to meet its reporting obligations, which could have an adverse effect on its business or the market price of the Company’s securities.

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

Not applicable.

 

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Item 2. Properties

The Company owns and leases approximately 1.8 million and 5.5 million square feet of space, respectively, of which approximately 36% is located in the United States. The following table summarizes certain of the Company’s key facilities:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

Leased

    

 

 

 

 

Square

 

or

 

 

 

Location

 

Footage

 

Owned

 

Primary Use

 

Groveport, Ohio

 

580,000

 

Leased

 

TS warehousing, integration and value-added operations

 

Chandler, Arizona

 

400,000

 

Owned

 

EM warehousing and value-added operations

 

Tongeren, Belgium

 

390,000

 

Owned

 

EM and TS warehousing and value-added operations

 

Poing, Germany

 

570,000

 

Owned

 

EM warehousing, value-added operations and offices

 

Chandler, Arizona

 

230,000

 

Leased

 

EM and TS warehousing, integration and value-added operations

 

Nettetal, Germany

 

200,000

 

Owned

 

TS warehousing and value-added operations

 

Hong Kong, China

 

180,000

 

Leased

 

EM warehousing and value-added operations

 

Duluth, Georgia

 

180,000

 

Leased

 

TS warehousing, integration and value-added operations

 

Phoenix, Arizona

 

180,000

 

Leased

 

Corporate and EM Americas headquarters

 

Tempe, Arizona

 

130,000

 

Leased

 

TS Americas headquarters

 

 

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

As a result primarily of certain former manufacturing operations, Avnet has incurred and may have future liability under various federal, state and local environmental laws and regulations, including those governing pollution and exposure to, and the handling, storage and disposal of, hazardous substances. For example, under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (“CERCLA”) and similar state laws, Avnet is and may be liable for the costs of cleaning up environmental contamination on or from certain of its current or former properties, and at off-site locations where the Company disposed of wastes in the past. Such laws may impose joint and several liability. Typically, however, the costs for clean up at such sites are allocated among potentially responsible parties based upon each party’s relative contribution to the contamination, and other factors.

Pursuant to SEC regulations, including but not limited to Item 103 of Regulation S-K, the Company regularly assesses the status of and developments in pending environmental and other compliance related legal proceedings to determine whether any such proceedings should be identified specifically in this discussion of legal proceedings, and has concluded that no particular pending legal proceeding requires public disclosure. Based on the information known to date, management believes that the Company has appropriately accrued in its consolidated financial statements for its share of the estimable costs of environmental and other compliance related matters.

The Company is also party to various other lawsuits, claims, investigations and other legal proceedings arising from time to time in the normal course of business. While litigation is subject to inherent uncertainties, management currently believes that the ultimate outcome of these proceedings, individually and in the aggregate, will not have a material adverse effect on the Company’s financial position, liquidity or results of operations.

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable.

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PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market price per share

The Company’s common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol AVT. Quarterly high and low stock closing prices (as reported for the New York Stock Exchange composite transactions) and dividends declared for the last two fiscal years were:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

2015

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Dividends

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Dividends

 

Fiscal Quarters

 

High

 

Low

 

Declared

 

High

 

Low

 

Declared

 

1st

 

$

44.04

 

$

38.63

 

$

0.17

 

$

45.17

 

$

40.88

 

$

0.16

 

2nd

 

 

46.95

 

 

42.84

 

 

0.17

 

 

45.05

 

 

36.54

 

 

0.16

 

3rd

 

 

44.80

 

 

37.78

 

 

0.17

 

 

47.12

 

 

40.97

 

 

0.16

 

4th

 

 

44.75

 

 

38.92

 

 

0.17

 

 

46.15

 

 

42.09

 

 

0.16

 

The declaration and payment of future dividends will be at the discretion of the Board of Directors and will be dependent upon the Company’s financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements, and other factors the Board of Directors deems relevant. In addition, certain of the Company’s debt facilities may restrict the declaration and payment of dividends, depending upon the Company’s then current compliance with certain covenants.

Record Holders

As of July 29, 2016, there were 2,336 registered holders of record of Avnet’s common stock.

Equity Compensation Plan Information as of July 2, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Securities

 

 

 

Number of

 

 

 

to be Issued

 

Weighted-

 

Securities

 

 

 

Upon

 

Average

 

Remaining

 

 

 

Exercise of

 

Exercise Price of 

 

Available for

 

 

 

Outstanding

 

Outstanding

 

Future Issuance

 

 

 

Options,

 

Options,

 

Under Equity

 

 

 

Warrants and

 

Warrants and

 

Compensation

 

Plan Category

 

Rights

 

Rights

 

Plans

 

Equity compensation plans approved by security holders

 

4,635,263

(1)   

$

34.61

 

3,263,033

(2)  


(1)

Includes 2,325,397 shares subject to options outstanding, 1,720,219 restricted stock units and 589,647 performance share units awarded but not yet vested or vested but not yet delivered.

(2)

Does not include 219,070 shares available for future issuance under the Employee Stock Purchase Plan, which is a non-compensatory plan.

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Stock Performance Graphs and Cumulative Total Returns

The graph below compares the cumulative 5-year total return of holders of Avnet, Inc.’s common stock with the cumulative total returns of the S&P 500 index and certain of Avnet’s peer companies (“peer group”) in the technology distribution industry. The graph tracks the performance of a hypothetical $100 investment in Avnet’s common stock, in the peer group, and the S&P 500 index (with the reinvestment of all dividends) from July 2, 2011 to July 2, 2016. The companies comprising the peer group that Avnet has historically used are:  Agilysys, Inc., Anixter International, Inc., Arrow Electronics, Inc., Ingram Micro, Inc., Insight Enterprises, Inc., Scansource, Inc., Synnex Corp. and Tech Data Corp.

 

PICTURE 1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

7/2/2011

    

6/30/2012

    

6/29/2013

    

6/28/2014

    

6/27/2015

    

7/2/2016

 

Avnet, Inc.

 

$

100

 

$

94.81

 

$

103.23

 

$

136.23

 

$

133.08

 

$

129.39

 

S&P 500

 

 

100

 

 

105.45

 

 

127.17

 

 

158.46

 

 

170.22

 

 

177.02

 

Peer Group

 

 

100

 

 

89.25

 

 

103.96

 

 

153.33

 

 

140.74

 

 

157.85

 

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The stock price performance included in this graph is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance. The Company does not make or endorse any predictions as to future stock performance. The performance graph is furnished solely to accompany this Report and is not being filed for purposes of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and is not to be incorporated by reference into any filing of the Company, whether made before or after the date hereof, regardless of any general incorporation language in such filing.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

In August 2015, the Company’s Board of Directors amended the Company’s existing share repurchase program to authorize the repurchase of up to $1.25 billion of common stock in the open market or through privately negotiated transactions. The timing and actual number of shares repurchased will depend on a variety of factors such as share price, corporate and regulatory requirements, and prevailing market conditions. The following table includes, if any, the Company’s monthly purchases of Avnet’s common stock during the fourth fiscal quarter ended July 2, 2016, under the share repurchase program, which is part of a publicly announced plan:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Total Number of 

 

 Approximate Dollar 

 

 

 

Total

 

Average

 

 Shares Purchased 

 

 Value of Shares That 

 

 

 

Number

 

Price

 

 as Part of Publicly 

 

 May Yet Be 

 

 

 

of Shares

 

Paid per

 

 Announced Plans 

 

 Purchased under the

 

Period

 

Purchased

 

Share

 

 or Programs 

 

Plans or Programs 

 

April

    

91,452

    

$

41.37

    

91,452

    

$

217,916,000

 

May

 

1,086,721

 

$

39.55

 

1,086,721

 

$

174,932,000

 

June

 

 —

 

$

 —

 

 —

 

$

174,932,000

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended

 

 

    

July 2,

    

June 27,

    

June 28,

    

June 29,

    

June 30,

 

 

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

 

2012

 

 

 

(Millions, except for per share and ratio data)

 

Income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales (a)

 

$

26,219.3

 

$

27,924.7

 

$

27,499.7

 

$

25,458.9

 

$

25,707.5

 

Gross profit

 

 

3,037.5

 

 

3,193.1

 

 

3,225.7

 

 

2,979.8

 

 

3,050.6

 

Operating income (b)

 

 

787.7

 

 

827.7

 

 

789.9

 

 

626.0

 

 

884.2

 

Income tax expense (c)

 

 

164.0

 

 

141.1

 

 

155.5

 

 

99.2

 

 

223.8

 

Net income (d)

 

 

506.5

 

 

571.9

 

 

545.6

 

 

450.1

 

 

567.0

 

Financial Position:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Working capital (e)

 

 

4,061.5

 

 

4,312.6

 

 

3,907.6

 

 

3,443.0

 

 

3,335.4

 

Total assets

 

 

11,239.8

 

 

10,800.0

 

 

11,255.5

 

 

10,474.7

 

 

10,167.9

 

Long-term debt

 

 

1,339.2

 

 

1,646.5

 

 

1,213.8

 

 

1,207.0

 

 

1,272.0

 

Shareholders’ equity

 

 

4,691.3

 

 

4,685.0

 

 

4,890.2

 

 

4,289.1

 

 

3,905.7

 

Per Share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic earnings

 

 

3.87

 

 

4.18

 

 

3.95

 

 

3.26

 

 

3.85

 

Diluted earnings

 

 

3.80

 

 

4.12

 

 

3.89

 

 

3.21

 

 

3.79

 

Cash dividends declared

 

 

0.68

 

 

0.64

 

 

0.60

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

Book value per diluted share

 

 

35.2

 

 

33.8

 

 

34.90

 

 

30.64

 

 

26.12

 

Ratios:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Operating income as a percentage of sales

 

 

3.0

%  

 

3.0

%  

 

2.9

%  

 

2.5

%  

 

3.4

%  

Net income as a percentage of sales

 

 

1.9

%  

 

2.0

%  

 

2.0

%  

 

1.8

%  

 

2.2

%  

Return on capital

 

 

10.7

%  

 

11.6

%  

 

11.4

%  

 

10.6

%  

 

12.9

%  

Quick ratio

 

 

1.2:1

 

 

1.4:1

 

 

1.2:1

 

 

1.2:1

 

 

1.2:1

 

Current ratio

 

 

1.8:1

 

 

2.0:1

 

 

1.8:1

 

 

1.7:1

 

 

1.7:1

 

Total debt to capital

 

 

34.7

%  

 

29.7

%  

 

29.8

%  

 

32.3

%  

 

35.4

%  


(a)

Fiscal 2016 contained 53 weeks compared to 52 weeks in the other fiscal years presented.

(b)

All fiscal years presented include restructuring, integration and other expenses, which totaled $79.3 million before tax, $52.3 million after tax and $0.39 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2016, $90.8 million before tax, $65.9 million after tax and $0.47 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2015, $94.6 million before tax, $70.8 million after tax and $0.50 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2014, $149.5 million before tax, $116.4 million after tax and $0.83 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2013, and $73.6 million before tax, $53.0 million after tax and $0.35 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2012.

(c)

All fiscal years presented included the impact of tax benefits primarily due to the release of valuation allowances net of additional reserves including $16.5 million and $0.12 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2016,  $55.1 million and $0.39 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2015, $43.8 million and $0.31 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2014, $50.4 million and $0.36 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2013, and $8.6 million and $0.06 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2012.

(d)

All fiscal years presented were impacted by other expense or income amounts that impact the comparability between years including a gain on legal settlement of $22.1 million before tax, $13.5 million after tax and $0.09 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2014, a gain on bargain purchase and other of $31.0 million before and after tax and $0.22 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2013, and a gain on bargain purchase and other of $2.9 million before tax, $3.5 million after tax and $0.02 per share on a diluted basis in fiscal 2012.

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(e)

This calculation of working capital is defined as current assets less current liabilities. Amounts for all years reflect the reclassification of deferred taxes to long term from current as a result of the adoption of a new accounting standard.

Summary of quarterly results:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

First

    

Second

    

Third

    

Fourth

    

Fiscal

 

 

 

Quarter

 

Quarter

 

Quarter

 

Quarter

 

Year (a)

 

 

 

(Millions, except per share amounts)

 

2016 (b)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales

 

$

6,969.7

 

$

6,848.1

 

$

6,174.7

 

$

6,226.8

 

$

26,219.3

 

Gross profit

 

 

791.5

 

 

778.2

 

 

736.8

 

 

731.0

 

 

3,037.5

 

Net income

 

 

130.2

 

 

156.0

 

 

123.5

 

 

96.8

 

 

506.5

 

Diluted earnings per share

 

 

0.96

 

 

1.16

 

 

0.94

 

 

0.75

 

 

3.80

 

2015 (c)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales

 

$

6,839.6

 

$

7,551.9

 

$

6,736.9

 

$

6,796.3

 

$

27,924.7

 

Gross profit

 

 

795.5

 

 

837.5

 

 

774.4

 

 

785.8

 

 

3,193.1

 

Net income

 

 

127.9

 

 

163.7

 

 

121.5

 

 

158.7

 

 

571.9

 

Diluted earnings per share

 

 

0.91

 

 

1.18

 

 

0.88

 

 

1.15

 

 

4.12

 


(a)

Quarters may not total to the fiscal year due to rounding.

(b)

First quarter of fiscal 2016 results were impacted by restructuring, integration and other expenses of $26.0 million before tax, $17.1 million after tax and $0.12 per share on a diluted basis and an income tax expense of $0.4 million. Second quarter results were impacted by restructuring, integration and other expenses of $21.2 million before tax, $14.1 million after tax and $0.10 per share on a diluted basis and an income tax benefit of $11.3 million. Third quarter results were impacted by restructuring, integration and other expenses of $16.2 million before tax, $10.8 million after tax and $0.08 per share on a diluted basis and an income tax benefit of $7.1 million. Fourth quarter results were impacted by restructuring, integration and other expenses of $16.0 million before tax, $10.3 million after tax and $0.08 per share on a diluted basis and an income tax expense of $1.4 million and $0.08 per share on a diluted   basis.

(c)

First quarter of fiscal 2015 results were impacted by restructuring, integration and other expenses of $18.3 million before tax, $13.2 million after tax and $0.09 per share on a diluted basis and an income tax benefit of $5.9 million. Second quarter results were impacted by restructuring, integration and other expenses of $13.3 million before tax, $10.2 million after tax and $0.07 per share on a diluted basis and an income tax benefit of $5.6 million. Third quarter results were impacted by restructuring, integration and other expenses of $15.5 million before tax, $12.0 million after tax and $0.09 per share on a diluted basis and an income tax expense of $2.2 million. Fourth quarter results were impacted by restructuring, integration and other expenses of $43.7 million before tax, $30.5 million after tax and $0.22 per share on a diluted basis and an income tax benefit of $45.8 million and $0.33 per share on a diluted basis as a result of the release of valuation allowances against certain deferred tax assets.

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

For an understanding of Avnet and the significant factors that influenced the Company’s performance during the past three fiscal years, the following discussion should be read in conjunction with the description of the business appearing in Item 1 of this Report and the consolidated financial statements, including the related notes and schedule, and other information appearing in Item 15 of this Report. The Company operates on a “52/53 week” fiscal year. Fiscal 2016 contained 53 weeks, fiscal 2015 and 2014 both contained 52 weeks. The extra week, which occurred in the first quarter of fiscal 2016, impacts the year-over-year analysis of fiscal 2016 in this MD&A.

There are references to the impact of foreign currency translation in the discussion of the Company’s results of operations. When the U.S. Dollar strengthens and the stronger exchange rates of the current year are used to translate the results of operations of Avnet’s subsidiaries denominated in foreign currencies, the resulting impact is a decrease in U.S. Dollars of reported results. Conversely, when the U.S. Dollar weakens and the weaker exchange rates of the current year are used to translate the results of operations of Avnet’s subsidiaries denominated in foreign currencies, the resulting impact is an increase in U.S. Dollars of reported results. In the discussion that follows, results excluding this impact, primarily for subsidiaries in EMEA, and Asia/Pacific, are referred to as “excluding the translation impact of changes in foreign currency exchange rates” or “constant currency.”

In addition to disclosing financial results that are determined in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S. (“GAAP”), the Company also discloses certain non-GAAP financial information, including:

·

Sales, income or expense items excluding the translation impact of changes in foreign currency exchange rates for subsidiaries reporting in currencies other than the U.S. Dollar by adjusting the average exchange rates used in current period to be consistent with the average exchange rates in effect during the comparative period, as discussed above.

·

Sales adjusted for certain items that impact the year-over-year analysis, which includes the impact of certain acquisitions or divestitures by adjusting Avnet’s prior periods to include the sales of acquired businesses or exclude the sales of divested businesses as if the acquisitions or divestitures had occurred at the beginning of the earliest period presented. In addition, fiscal 2016 sales are adjusted for the estimated impact of the extra week of sales in the first quarter of fiscal 2016 due to it being a 14-week quarter, as discussed above. Sales taking into account these adjustments are referred to as “organic sales.”

·

Operating income excluding (i) restructuring, integration and other expenses (see Restructuring, Integration and Other Expenses in this MD&A) and (ii) amortization of acquired intangible assets and other. Operating income excluding such amounts is referred to as “adjusted operating income.”

The reconciliation of operating income to adjusted operating income is presented in the following table:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended

 

    

 

July 2,

    

June 27,

    

June 28,

 

 

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

 

 

 

(Thousands)

Operating income

 

 

$

787,669

 

$

827,673

 

$

789,940

Restructuring, integration and other expenses

 

 

 

79,318

 

 

90,805

 

 

94,623

Amortization of acquired intangible assets and other

 

 

 

28,614

 

 

54,049

 

 

46,783

Adjusted operating income

 

 

$

895,601

 

$

972,527

 

$

931,346

 

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Management believes that providing this additional information is useful to the reader to better assess and understand operating performance, especially when comparing results with prior periods or forecasting performance for future periods, primarily because management typically monitors the business both including and excluding these adjustments to GAAP results. Management also uses these non-GAAP measures to establish operational goals and, in many cases, for measuring performance for compensation purposes. However, any analysis of results on a non-GAAP basis should be used as a complement to, and in conjunction with, results presented in accordance with GAAP.

Results of Operations

Executive Summary

Sales for fiscal 2016 were $26.22 billion, a decrease of 6.1% from fiscal 2015 sales of $27.92 billion. Organic sales in constant currency decreased 5.3% year over year. EM sales of $16.57 billion decreased 4.5% and organic sales in constant currency decreased 3.7% year over year. TS sales of $9.65 billion decreased 8.8% and organic sales in constant currency decreased 7.9% year over year. 

Gross profit margin of 11.6% increased 16 basis points from fiscal 2015 primarily as a result of gross profit margin improvements at TS across all regions, partially offset by declines at EM. 

Operating income margin was 3.0% in fiscal 2016 and in fiscal 2015. Excluding restructuring, integration and other expenses and amortization expense associated with acquired intangible assets from both periods, adjusted operating income margin was 3.4% in fiscal 2016 as compared to 3.5% in fiscal 2015. EM operating income margin of 4.4% decreased 22 basis points year over year primarily due to declines in the Americas region. TS operating income margin of 3.3% increased 21 basis points year over year primarily due to improvements in EMEA.

Three-Year Analysis of Sales: By Region in Each Operating Group and Geography

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Years Ended

 

Percent Change

 

 

  

July 2,

   

% of

    

June 27,

   

% of

    

June 28,

   

% of

      

2016 to 

    

2015 to 

 

 

 

2016

 

Total

 

2015

 

Total

 

2014

 

Total

 

2015

 

2014

 

 

 

(Dollars in millions)

 

Sales by Region in Each Operating Group:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

EM Americas

 

$

4,665.3

 

17.8

%  

$

4,922.1

 

17.6

%  

$

4,844.9

 

17.6

%  

(5.2)

%  

1.6

%

EM EMEA

 

 

5,091.3

 

19.4

 

 

5,004.6

 

17.9

 

 

5,094.9

 

18.5

 

1.7

 

(1.8)

 

EM Asia

 

 

6,810.2

 

26.0

 

 

7,418.0

 

26.6

 

 

6,604.6

 

24.0

 

(8.2)

 

12.3

 

Total EM

 

 

16,566.8

 

63.2

 

 

17,344.7

 

62.1

 

 

16,544.4

 

60.1

 

(4.5)

 

4.8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TS Americas

 

 

5,758.3

 

21.9

 

 

6,221.9

 

22.3

 

 

6,084.6

 

22.1

 

(7.5)

 

2.3

 

TS EMEA

 

 

2,719.7

 

10.4

 

 

2,871.6

 

10.3

 

 

3,151.2

 

11.5

 

(5.3)

 

(8.9)

 

TS Asia

 

 

1,174.5

 

4.5

 

 

1,486.5

 

5.3

 

 

1,719.5

 

6.3

 

(21.0)

 

(13.6)

 

Total TS

 

 

9,652.5

 

36.8

 

 

10,580.0

 

37.9

 

 

10,955.3

 

39.9

 

(8.8)

 

(3.4)

 

Total Avnet

 

$

26,219.3

 

 

 

$

27,924.7

 

 

 

$

27,499.7

 

 

 

(6.1)

 

1.5

 

Sales by Geographic Area:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americas

 

$

10,423.6

 

39.8

%  

$

11,144.0

 

39.9

%  

$

10,929.5

 

39.7

%  

(6.5)

%  

2.0

%

EMEA

 

 

7,811.0

 

29.8

 

 

7,876.2

 

28.2

 

 

8,246.1

 

30.0

 

(0.8)

 

(4.5)

 

Asia/Pacific

 

 

7,984.7

 

30.4

 

 

8,904.5

 

31.9

 

 

8,324.1

 

30.3

 

(10.3)

 

7.0

 

Total Avnet

 

$

26,219.3

 

 

 

$

27,924.7

 

 

 

$

27,499.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Table of Contents

Sales

Items Impacting Year-over-Year Sales Comparisons

During fiscal 2016 and 2014, the Company acquired businesses impacting both operating groups, as presented in the following table. There were no acquisitions in fiscal 2015. To facilitate more meaningful year-over-year comparisons, the discussions that follow include organic sales as well as sales on a reported basis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

    

Approximate 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annualized

 

 

 

Acquired Business

 

Group & Region

 

Sales  (1)

 

Acquisition Date

 

 

 

 

 

(Millions)

 

 

 

Fiscal 2016

    

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

ExitCertified

 

TS Americas

 

$

24

 

January 2016

 

Orchestra Service GmbH

 

TS EMEA

 

 

95

 

November 2015

 

Total fiscal 2016

 

 

 

$

119

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MSC Investoren GmbH

 

EM EMEA

 

$

461

 

October 2013

 

Nisko Semiconductors, Ltd.

 

EM EMEA

 

 

18

 

August 2013

 

Seamless Technologies, Inc.

 

TS Americas

 

 

13

 

July 2013

 

Total fiscal 2014

 

 

 

$

492

 

 

 


(1)

Represents the approximate annual sales for the acquired businesses’ most recent fiscal year prior to acquisition by Avnet and based upon average foreign currency exchange rates for such fiscal year.

Fiscal 2016 Comparison to Fiscal 2015

The table below provides the comparison of reported fiscal 2016 and 2015   sales for the Company and its operating groups to organic sales to allow readers to better assess and understand the Company’s sales performance by operating group.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales from

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisitions/

 

 

 

 

2016 to 2015

 

 

 

 

 

Divestitures/

 

 

 

 

Organic

 

 

 

 

 

Sales as

 

Estimated

 

Organic

 

Sales

 

Constant

 

    

Reported

    

Extra Week

    

Sales

    

Change

    

Currency

 

 

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

EM

 

$

16,566.8

 

$

(300.0)

 

$

16,266.8

 

(6.2)

%

 

(3.7)

%

TS

 

 

9,652.5

 

 

(164.1)

 

 

9,488.4

 

(11.4)

 

 

(7.9)

 

Fiscal 2016

 

$

26,219.3

 

$

(464.1)

 

$

25,755.2

 

(8.2)

 

 

(5.3)

 

EM

 

$

17,344.7

 

$

 —

 

$

17,344.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

TS

 

 

10,580.0

 

 

125.7

 

 

10,705.7

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal 2015

 

$

27,924.7

 

$

125.7

 

$

28,050.4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales for fiscal 2016 were $26.22 billion, a decrease of 6.1%, or $1.7 billion, from fiscal 2015 sales of $27.92 billion. Organic sales decreased 8.2% year over year and decreased 5.3% in constant currency. The organic sales decrease was primarily due to declines in both operating groups as discussed further below. 

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EM sales of $16.57 billion for fiscal 2016 decreased 4.5% from fiscal 2015 sales of $17.34 billion and decreased 2.0% in constant currency year over year.  These decreases were due to declines in sales in the Americas and Asia regions, partially offset by an increase in sales in the EMEA region. Sales in the Americas decreased 5.2% due to lower overall demand in the industrial markets EM Americas serves and from disruptions in customer delivery and service capabilities resulting from an ERP implementation in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2016. In EMEA, organic sales in constant currency increased 7.8% due to strong demand in the industrial markets served across the region. Asia sales decreased 8.2% year over year, which was primarily due to decreased select high volume supply chain engagements in fiscal 2016 compared to fiscal 2015. 

TS sales of $9.65 billion for fiscal 2016 decreased 8.8% from fiscal 2015 sales of $10.58 billion. Sales in constant currency decreased 5.2% year over year and organic sales in constant currency decreased 7.9%. On a regional basis, organic sales decreased 9.8% in the Americas region, 2.9% in the EMEA region in constant currency, and 16.5% in the Asia region in constant currency.  Each of these decreases in sales was primarily due to lower overall demand for certain legacy datacenter products and from the impact of changes in product mix. At a product level, increases in networking, services and software were partially offset by decreases in servers and storage.

Fiscal 2015 Comparison to Fiscal 2014

The table below provides the comparison of reported fiscal 2015 and 2014   sales for the Company and its operating groups to organic sales to allow readers to better assess and understand the Company’s sales performance by operating group.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015 to 2014

 

 

 

 

 

Sales from

 

 

 

 

Organic

 

 

 

 

 

Sales as

 

Acquisitions/

 

Organic

 

Sales

 

Constant

 

    

Reported

    

Divestitures

 

Sales

    

Change

    

Currency

 

 

(Dollars in millions)

 

 

 

 

EM

 

$

17,344.7

 

$

 —

    

$

17,344.7

 

4.1

%

 

8.3

%

TS

 

 

10,580.0

 

 

 —

 

 

10,580.0

 

(3.4)

 

 

(0.1)

 

Fiscal 2015

 

$

27,924.7

 

$

 —

 

$

27,924.7

 

1.1

 

 

5.0

 

EM

 

$

16,544.4

 

$

119.9

    

$

16,664.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

TS

 

 

10,955.3

 

 

 

 

10,955.3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiscal 2014

 

$

27,499.7

 

$

119.9

 

$

27,619.6

 

 

 

 

 

 


Consolidated sales for fiscal 2015 were $27.92 billion, an increase of 1.5%, or $425.0 million, from fiscal 2014 consolidated sales of $27.50 billion. Organic sales increased 1.1% year over year and increased 5.0% in constant currency. The organic sales increase was primarily due to growth at EM as discussed further below. 

EM sales of $17.34 billion for fiscal 2015 increased 4.8% from fiscal 2014 sales of $16.54 billion. EM sales were impacted by the weaker Euro during fiscal 2015 in comparison to fiscal 2014 as EM organic sales in constant currency increased 8.3% year over year due to growth across all regions. On a regional basis, organic sales in the Americas increased 1.6% year over year. In EMEA, organic sales in constant currency increased 7.8% due to strong demand across the region. Asia sales increased 12.3% year over year, which was primarily due to increased select high volume supply chain engagements in fiscal 2015 compared to fiscal 2014. The higher growth rate in Asia and the effect of the weaker Euro during fiscal 2015 resulted in a regional shift in the mix of sales toward Asia, which represented approximately 43% of total EM sales in fiscal 2015 compared to approximately 40% in fiscal 2014. Such regional mix shift had a corresponding impact on fiscal 2015 EM gross profit margin and operating income margin. 

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TS sales of $10.58 billion for fiscal 2015 decreased 3.4% from fiscal 2014 sales of $10.96 billion. Sales remained flat year over year in constant currency. On the regional basis, sales in the Americas region increased 2.3%. In EMEA, sales in constant currency decreased 1.4%. Asia sales decreased 13.6% year over year, which was primarily due to double digit declines in computing components.

Gross Profit and Gross Profit Margins

Gross profit in fiscal 2016 was $3.04 billion, a decrease of $155.6 million, or 4.9%, from fiscal 2015. Gross profit decreased 3.3% year over year on an organic basis in constant currency primarily resulting from decreases in sales at both operating groups. Gross profit margin of 11.6% increased 16 basis points year over year primarily as a result of increases at TS due to product mix difference between years.

Gross profit in fiscal 2015 was $3.19 billion, a decrease of $32.6 million, or 1.0%, from fiscal 2014 and an increase of 3.3% year over year on an organic basis in constant currency. Gross profit margin of 11.4% decreased 30 basis points year over year. EM gross profit margin decreased year over year primarily related to the above mentioned geographic mix shift towards Asia, the weaker Euro adversely impacting the contribution to gross profit margin from the higher margin EMEA region and from declines in Asia from an increase in select high volume supply chain engagements, which were partially offset by an increase in gross profit margin in EMEA. TS gross profit margin decreased slightly year over year, with improvements in the EMEA and Asia regions being offset by a decline in the Americas.

Selling, General and Administrative Expenses

Selling, general and administrative expenses (“SG&A expenses”) were $2.17 billion in fiscal 2016, a decrease of $104.1 million, or 4.6%, from fiscal 2015. The year-over-year decrease in SG&A expenses was primarily due to reductions at both EM and TS as a result of changes in foreign currency exchange rates between years, and the impact of prior restructuring actions partially offset by an increase in SG&A expenses for acquisitions and other costs, including employee merit compensation increases that took place in January 2016. In fiscal 2016, SG&A expenses as a percentage of sales were 8.3% and as a percentage of gross profit were 71.5% as compared with 8.1% and 71.2%, respectively, in fiscal 2015. SG&A expenses as a percentage of gross profit at EM increased 147 basis points year over year due primarily to lower sales, partially offset by lower SG&A expenses due primarily to the benefits of recent restructuring and cost savings actions. SG&A expenses as a percentage of gross profit at TS decreased 64 basis points from fiscal 2015 due primarily to the benefits of recent restructuring and cost savings actions and improvements in gross profit margin in all three regions.

SG&A expenses were $2.27 billion in fiscal 2015, a decrease of $66.5 million, or 2.8%, from fiscal 2014. This decrease consisted primarily of decreases due to the impact of differences in foreign currency exchange rates between the fiscal years and decreases due to prior restructuring actions. These decreases were partially offset by increases due to fiscal 2014 acquisitions and increases to fund organic growth and other costs. In fiscal 2015, SG&A expenses as a percentage of sales were 8.1% and as a percentage of gross profit were 71.2% as compared with 8.5% and 72.6%, respectively, in fiscal 2014. SG&A expenses as a percentage of gross profit at EM decreased 197 basis points year over year due primarily to the benefits of recent restructuring and cost savings actions and from an increase in gross profit due to increased sales, partially offset by increases associated with fiscal 2014 acquisitions and increases to fund organic growth and other costs. SG&A expenses as a percentage of gross profit at TS decreased 224 basis points from fiscal 2014 due primarily to the benefits of recent restructuring and costs savings actions, partially offset by the decrease in gross profit and increases to fund organic growth and other costs. 

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Restructuring, Integration and Other Expenses

During fiscal 2016, the Company incurred restructuring expenses related to certain actions intended to reduce future operating expenses. These actions include activities related to the Avnet Advantage initiative, which is focused on creating long-term operational efficiencies. In addition, the Company incurred integration and other costs primarily associated with the integration of acquired businesses, the integration of certain global and regional businesses, the integration of significant information technology systems and other costs associated with the acquisition of and the closure or divestiture of certain businesses. As a result, during fiscal 2016 the Company recorded restructuring, integration and other expenses of $79.3 million. The Company recorded $52.8 million for restructuring costs, and expects to realize approximately $57.0 million in incremental annualized operating costs savings as a result of such restructuring actions. The incremental annualized cost savings are expected to benefit EM by approximately $24.0 million and TS by approximately $33.0 million.  Restructuring expenses consisted of $45.6 million for severance, $5.1 million for facility exit costs, $1.3 million for asset impairments, and $0.8 million for other restructuring expenses. Integration and other costs including acquisition costs were $10.4 million and $19.8 million, respectively. The Company also recorded a net benefit of $3.7 million for changes in estimates for restructuring liabilities established in prior years. The after tax impact of restructuring, integration and other expenses were $52.3 million and $0.39 per share on a diluted basis.   

During fiscal 2015, the Company took certain restructuring actions in an effort to reduce future operating costs including restructuring activities for certain regional and global businesses to better align such operations, products and services with the known and anticipated demands of the Company’s suppliers and customers. In addition, the Company incurred integration and other costs primarily associated with acquired businesses and certain global and regional businesses. As a result, during fiscal 2015 the Company recorded restructuring, integration and other expenses of $90.8 million. The Company recorded $58.7 million for restructuring costs, which consisted of $25.9 million for severance, $8.8 million for facility exit costs, $18.2 million for asset impairments, and $5.8 million for other restructuring expenses. Integration and other costs including acquisition costs were $19.1 million and $13.7 million, respectively. The Company also recorded a net benefit of $0.7 million for changes in estimates for restructuring liabilities established in prior years. The after tax impact of restructuring, integration and other expenses were $65.9 million and $0.47 per share on a diluted basis

During fiscal 2014, the Company took certain actions in an effort to reduce future operating costs including activities necessary to achieve planned synergies from recently acquired businesses. In addition, the Company incurred integration and other costs primarily associated with acquired or divested businesses and for the consolidation of facilities. As a result, during fiscal 2014 the Company recorded restructuring, integration and other expenses of $94.6 million. Restructuring expenses of $65.7 million consisted of $53.3 million for severance, $11.6 million for facility exit costs and asset impairments, and $0.9 million for other restructuring expenses. Integration and other costs including acquisition costs were $20.5 million and $8.8 million, respectively. The Company also recorded a net benefit of $0.3 million for changes in estimates for restructuring liabilities established in prior years. The after tax impact of restructuring, integration and other expenses was $70.8 million and $0.50 per share on a diluted basis.

See Note 17, “Restructuring, integration and other expenses” to the Company’s consolidated financial statements included in Item 15 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information related to restructuring, integration and other expenses.